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satw - britain, ireland, and france - medieval by aldohyeah satw - britain, ireland, and france - medieval by aldohyeah
here's the satw characters of britain, ireland, and france... in mediŠval style!

usually they're wearing the flags we know today, but i'm drawing them with the royal banners they used to fly back in the old times.

england wears the royal standard of england (without the arms of ireland, and scotland combined in it) [link] . i gave him a crown because england claimed the rulership of scotland, wales, ireland, and even france as an inheritance from his anglo-norman ancestors.

france (on righthand side of england) wears the flag of mediaeval france [link] . i feel the need to include france, because her rivalry with england is always an epic story, like the story of william the conqueror and jeanne d'arc.

wales (on lefthand side of england) wears the "flag of gwynedd" [link]

scotland (the rightmost) is wearing the royal standard of scotland [link] , under a kilt (i don't know if it's called kilt; i always thought the kilt is like the one like a skirt). well, my only reference is the movie 'braveheart' :D , which includes the battle of stirling.. so that's why the pic of the uncoloured version of him [link] i called "the man from stirling".. hahahaha :D

ireland's (the leftmost) clothes are based on the coat of arms of ireland in the past [link] .. i don't think it's the flag of mediaeval ireland, but i like it. not quite a thorough research! :P


the colours are made to be rudimentary and outside the lines.. for a purpose... (bad excuse :P). not perfect but i hope you like it. :)




background is taken from this [link] page.

all scandinavia and the world characters belong to :iconhumon:
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:iconedenianprince:
EdenianPrince Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2015
France for the win ! ;) 
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:iconknightorder:
knightorder Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2014
Technically the arms of Ireland (a gold harp on a blue field) IS medieval, but it didn't represent the country/kingdom until adopted by Henry VIII when he abolished the Lordship of Ireland in 1541. Before then, it was sometimes attributed to the Ard Ri of Ireland from the 13th century onwards. Before then, however, Ireland was divided into several kingdoms, each with their own symbols.

Also, if I may nitpick, the way Scotland is wearing his kilt is very post-medieval.
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:icondon-jam:
don-jam Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2013
That Is So Bloody Cool!
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:iconcaulaincourt:
Caulaincourt Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012
Ah, the good ol' days. Douce France...
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2012
merci d'avoir commentÚ :)
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:iconcaulaincourt:
Caulaincourt Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012
Ce fut mon plaisir
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:iconpaws4thot:
paws4thot Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012
Comments from an actual Scot, about Scotland:-

1) He is wearing a philamohr (also great kilt, or just plaid) which is correct in period.
2) From your notes, you're thinking of the philabeag (or small kilt) as the "pleated skirt".
3) The philamohr would normally be worn over a shirt as illustrated, but the shirt would normally be of plain linen or cotton, rather than dyed with the colours of a standard.
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012
thank you very much for the information. :)
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:iconpaws4thot:
paws4thot Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012
There's more:-
1) In period, clans would identify themselves by the pattern of their plaid (the origin of tartans), and frequently by a "device" (used in the heraldic meaning) on their cap or in their hair. This might be almost anything, including particular flower, or an identifiable specied of bird's feathers.
2) Like on your Scandanavian medievil characters, they would often carry a device (or representation of a clan badge) on their shields.
3) The origin of "nothing is worn under the kilt" is that they would often remove the philamohr before entering a planned battle, and attack wearing oly their shirts and devices.
Reply
:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2012
and as for a reply to the subject discussed here by *Karalora , ~Moschonn , and ~Telepfenion , from my own experience during my school years, history taught at school is mostly about our own country; about the migration of the mongoloid and austronesian race to the archipelago that will be the ancestors of all the ethnic groups in indonesia, the rise of hindu-buddhist kingdoms, rise of islamic kingdoms, european explorations of the archipelago, of how we became a dutch colony for almost 4 centuries, japanese expansion, post-independence era from 1945 to 1998, the 'reformation'. we don't study much about what happened across our seas.

what i studied about world history is: dawn of human civilization in egypt, babylonia, china, india, and sometimes about greece and rome. but all of those topics combined did not have more than 30 pages of discussion in the textbook. the school taught about the world war i & ii, too, but it didn't go much into detail.

i personally knew about the european history because of playing video games. i liked it, so i looked it up a little bit in school libraries, in encyclopaedias.

so if i made an inaccurate historical references, i hope you all will kindly tell me the right one. if i deliberately ignore the accuracy for my own pleasure :D, i will tell you in the description, just like what i did on ireland's clothes in this picture. :D

thank you very much guys! :D
Reply
:icontriska:
Triska Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2012  Student Photographer
Nice drawing. :)

One correction though. England's claim over France wasn't because kings of England have Guillaume le ConquÚrant as ancestor.

The story is this one, I let you shorten it. ;) in the beginning ot the 14th Century, Philippe 3 Le Bel had 4 living children: the eldest, Isabelle de France - also known in England as "French she-wolf" I believe - married to the king of England Eduard the 2nd, Louis, Philippe and Charles. When Philippe 3 died, the crown went to his eldest son, Louis. When Louis died, the crown went to his unborn son, who lived only a few days - supposed to have been poisoned. When Louis' son died, the crown went to Louis' first brother, Philippe, who died without sons. The crown went then to Charles. Who also died without sons.

Here's the trick: Philippe 4 le bel's crown had no direct heir, at list in France: the only living male among the king's descent was... Eduard, heir of the crown of England, who became Edouard 3 Plantagenŕt.
However, the greatest lords of France would have hated to see France crown on an English head. So the Pairs of France decided to come back to one of the oldest traditions of France: the election of the king. And they elected Philippe 3's nephew as king - who's nickname was "le roi trouvÚ".

At first, the young and new king Eduard 3 vaguely protested and claimed France crown.
Several years have passed, and the king changed his mind and claimed again the crown. And declared war to obtain it.


So here's the story. Abridged. If you wanna know more, there's a story in 7 parts available : "the Cursed Kings" (Les Rois Maudits) by Maurice Druon. ;)


Another thing, another correction: the coat of arms isn't that one for England if you wanna keep France by his side: the coat of arm of England kings when they claim France crown is that one: [link] : "quarterly, I and IV azure semy-de-lis Or; II and III gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or armed and langued azure" at first, then - when the kings of France changed their own coat of arms": [link] : "quarterly, I and IV azure three fleur-de-lis Or; II and III gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or armed and langued azure".


Sorry, I'm very maniac about this part of history. XD
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2012
i hope you're not offended by the shortness of my reply to your long comment, but thank you very much for the information, a very helpful addition to the page. :)
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:icontriska:
Triska Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2012  Student Photographer
Not at all. ;) And you're welcome.
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:iconscarlettp:
ScarlettP Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2012
Lovely, lovely, lovely idea!
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2012
thank you, thank you, thank you! :D
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:iconblackparademajorette:
blackparademajorette Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
you should draw France as Joan of Arc!
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
and she'll be wearing the flag that joan herself designed :D

thank you! :)
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:iconblackparademajorette:
blackparademajorette Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012
you're welcome. i've been called a generous fountain of inspiration, though my family tells me if i ever want to make money on my ideas i oughta keep my mouth shut.

i love Joan of Arc. i have this little info page about her (admittedly given to me from a catholic church) and i look a ton like her portrait.
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:iconcougashika:
cougashika Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
You're being too hard on yourself; since you mentioned the crown this must be post-1066, a chaotic era at best. Its not like you're depicting Merovingians and Jutes....
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
where am i being too hard on myself? am i using the wrong references?
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:iconmistertotality:
MisterTotality Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
Wonderful concept! You did manage to make it pretty accurate to that period in spite of doing little hard research on the matter.

If you're up for it, I think you should next go with the Scandinavian guys during the Viking period.
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
i wanted to do that, but as far as i know, in the viking period, the scandinavians haven't invented their flag yet, they were flying raven banners instead.

thank you! :)
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:iconrobofingers:
Robofingers Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
Very nice :) Reminds me of:

In a coat of gold or a coat of red,
A lion still has claws,
And mine are long and sharp, mi'lord,
As long and sharp as yours.
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
wow :wow:

is it made by you or an old poem?

thank you anyway :)
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:iconrobofingers:
Robofingers Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
I can't take credit for that one, as much as I'd like to.

That belongs to George R. R. Martin, author of A Game of Thrones.

Although I am a poet *shameless plug* Check out my gallery ;)
Reply
:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
i have read some of the poems you posted on the folder 'dark poetry', if you don't mind i'll be reading more. heheheh
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:iconrobofingers:
Robofingers Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
Ahh, that stuff's pretty old now. I'd like to think I've gotten better since I wrote those ones. But thanks! :D
Reply
:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
i find those are really good, and if you say you've gotten better.. :)

i used to be able to make poems (in my native language, mostly, but sometimes in english too) when i still went to school, but as i entered college it's gone. :XD:
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:iconrobofingers:
Robofingers Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
Thanks :)
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:iconlphogan:
LPHogan Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table! :-)
Great historic rendering!
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
thank you very much, :)
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:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I'm not sure England is really England without his monocle, but other than that this is a nice novel twist on the SatW concept.

The garment Scotland is wearing is called a great kilt. The regular kilt everyone is familiar with is a truncated version without the shoulder wrap.

And then the Scandinavia boys cruised in and set them all on fire. Yay! =P
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:iconmoschonn:
Moschonn Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
Actually the Viking raids were some centuries before the Britannic wars. Still, Norway came over, but they kicked him out again and proceded to smash in eachother's heads. Isn't history nice? :D
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:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
history's quite boring until age of empires came to existence. :D
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:iconmoschonn:
Moschonn Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
Actually, I know this from Medieval II: Total War. The Britannia expansion, to be precise. But I like Age of Empires, too.
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:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I know. I was trying to be funny, not accurate.
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:iconmoschonn:
Moschonn Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012
Guessed so, well, sorry in case I annoyed you ;)
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:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Nah, I'm not annoyed.

To be honest, I think I've learned more about European history and culture from SatW than I ever did in school.
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:iconmoschonn:
Moschonn Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2012
That's one of the many flaws of the American education system: the history curriculum are very USA-centric. I know that not all lessons about America, but as far as I know (which can be very far from the facts), it's mostly about the twohundredfifty years from the Thirteen Colonies to WWII. For camparison, history classes of my country are about the rise of Athens to the fall of the Berlin Wall, which is about ten times as long. Yet I have to admit that it's mostly about my country too, save for the Greek and Romans, and we've skipped Alexander the Great, the Crusades, the Mongol invasion and the Hundred-Years-War (all which I regret deeply), the Thirty-Years-War and most of the time between that and the French Revolution.
In fact, most of the things I "know" about medieval Europe I learned either from SatW or from games like Age of Empires II, Empire Earth and Medieval II: Total War, and as one can guess that "knowledge" isn't always really reliable.
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:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I expect the history curricula in most countries focus primarily on that country. What makes this particularly bad for the U.S. is that it's still a very new country and has been influenced tremendously by a large number of other countries. You can't get a proper view of U.S. history without studying world history, but they expect us to anyway. In the schools I attended, the world history courses came after the U.S. history courses, so we were missing that context.

Also, my teachers didn't know how to make it remotely interesting. It was just memorizing names and dates. There were no field trips associated with history class.
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:iconmoschonn:
Moschonn Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2012
Of course history classes are mostly about the country you're in, but you can overdo it. And who the set up such a stupid schedule? History is a fluent process, that you don't understand, if you just jump in the middle of things. You have to start at the beginning. Sometimes I don't understand how some people can be in charge of such things!

Yeah, history is highly teacher dependent. If your teacher is good, they'll make any era interesting one way or the other, but if they aren't, well, you seem to know well enough. We didn't do that much field trips, not just in history classes, but in general. All in all, we made about six or seven trips in the entire middle and high school time (Not counting the unnecessary class outings.)
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(2 Replies)
:iconaldohyeah:
aldohyeah Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
yes, i wasn't aware that corrective lenses had already been invented in the olden times :D

thank you! :)
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:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Granted, they were a very new thing in the Middle Ages. But I was referring more to the character, and how the monocle is such an essential part of his "veddy English" design. You could portray him fresh out from under the heel of Rome, and he wouldn't be right without the monocle.
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